DEQ implements changes to Oregon Clean Vehicle Rebate Program

The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has made big changes to the Oregon Clean Vehicle Rebate Program’s Charge Ahead Rebate. As of Jan. 1, 2022, low- and moderate-income households are eligible for $5,000 back with the purchase or lease of a new or used battery electric or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle. Previously, the Charge AheadContinue reading “DEQ implements changes to Oregon Clean Vehicle Rebate Program”

DEQ partnership will provide affordable loans for failing septic systems in Oregon

An affordable loan program is again available for homeowners and small businesses in Oregon to repair or replace failing septic systems. Fixing or replacing failing septic systems benefits Oregonians by protecting public health and addressing threats to water quality. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and regional nonprofit lender Craft3 are teaming up to makeContinue reading “DEQ partnership will provide affordable loans for failing septic systems in Oregon”

New “Bad Apple” campaign helps Oregonians save money by keeping foods fresher, longer

Spoiled food is costing Oregon households real money. In fact, every year the average household loses $1,600 by throwing away spoiled food. And while many people are already taking steps to reduce food waste, research funded by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality found that 85% of Oregon households agreed they could do more toContinue reading “New “Bad Apple” campaign helps Oregonians save money by keeping foods fresher, longer”

Fire clouds: Pyrocumulus, firenados and more

The sight of a pyrocumulus cloud just makes your jaw drop. “You go, ‘Oh my, wow,’ ” Peter Brewer, wildfire smoke coordinator for the Oregon Department says in a bonus episode of GreenState. Pyrocumulus clouds form over wildfires and can tower thousands of feet into the sky. Smoke is a main ingredient. Learn more aboutContinue reading “Fire clouds: Pyrocumulus, firenados and more”

The future of air quality and wildfire smoke in Oregon

“I’ll count to three this time and we’ll clap after three, ok? One. Two. Three…” Dylan Darling and Lauren Wirtis simultaneously clap into their microphones – a trick that makes it easier to align their separate recordings. You know in movies when the person says “take six!” and then snap the clapper board shut? SameContinue reading “The future of air quality and wildfire smoke in Oregon”

From landfill to housing: Cleanup begins at Stevens Ranch in Bend

Meandering through the sagebrush and juniper trails at the Stevens Road Tract in southeast Bend, a hiker might never suspect they are walking over acres of buried trash. Decades-old tires, building materials containing asbestos and household trash fill in former holes and collapsed lava tubes on about 40 acres of the newly planned 382-acre mixed-useContinue reading “From landfill to housing: Cleanup begins at Stevens Ranch in Bend”

Staff Spotlight on Sarah Idczak, her mapping skills are helping Oregon

Mention Earth Day, and DEQ’s Sarah Idczak thinks back to her days as an undergrad at Western Washington University.

“The environmental college hosted an Annual Earth Day Festival. There were live bands, great food and lots of dancing. It was a great chance to take a step back from all the environmental problems we were studying and celebrate the victories,” says Idczak. “It allowed us to take a breath and just celebrate this big, beautiful blue marble that we all get to call home.

In her own words: Reflections on being a woman in leadership

I’ve pursued paths that, while they weren’t unheard of for women, women were definitely in the minority. My undergraduate degree is in civil engineering—a time when women made up about 10% of the students in my degree program. That was the highest percentage among the all the engineering fields of study at the time.

First electric school buses come to Oregon, bringing fresh air to students

The Beaverton School District and Portland General Electric have partnered to bring the first two electric school buses to Oregon. Each vehicle will cut about 52,000 pounds of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere each year. That means students, drivers and neighborhoods will breathe cleaner air and overall air quality will improve.