Refuse and Recycling during COVID-19

“From Manzanita to Enterprise, and from Burns over to Brookings, the consistent service provided to residents and business during these uncertain times has helped to support the health and well-being of communities across the state.”

Lydia Emer, DEQ’s Land Quality Administrator

While many things have changed since COVID-19 entered our vernacular, buying stuff and creating waste hasn’t changed. And as people across Oregon have been asked to stay home, the consistent collection and transportation of solid waste, recycling and organic materials have allowed households and neighborhoods to avoid additional health and safety issues during these already challenging times. 

“From Manzanita to Enterprise, and from Burns over to Brookings, the consistent service provided to residents and business during these uncertain times has helped to support the health and well-being of communities across the state,” says Lydia Emer, DEQ’s Land Quality Administrator. “We’re grateful to these essential workers who are often working tirelessly behind the scenes.”

Last year alone, people in Oregon generated 5,652,826 tons of waste – about 7 pounds of waste per person per day. As businesses have shuttered, there has been a sharp drop in waste from the commercial sector, but households continue to generate waste as people are eating and shopping more  from home.

“The tireless efforts of collectors, transfer station workers, and material process facility staff have allowed the solid waste and recycling systems within Oregon to remain in operation and promote the proper disposal and recovery of materials throughout all corners of the state,” Emer says.

How can people help these essential workers?

To protect the environment and reduce waste, it’s important to learn how to recycle right! Here are some special considerations for Oregon households during COVID-19.

Published by Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

DEQ’s mission is to be a leader in restoring, maintaining and enhancing the quality of Oregon’s air, land and water.

%d bloggers like this: